Creative & Visual Arts

KS3 Visual Arts

Visual Arts 1

Intent

These are the exploratory and experimental years, building the corner stones of confidence using materials and media influenced by artists and cultures. We ensure that pupils study ways of recording and exploring through drawing using a range of media in the first stages of their project.

The Visual Arts Curriculum at DGS is designed to ensure the most significant areas of study across this vast subject are explored in breadth and depth at KS3. 2D visual language is the bedrock of artistic skill and, through studying this chapter thoroughly, we are able to both improve technical skill and introduce the formal elements to learners across a range of discipline, genre and artistic style. By working through the process of project work, learners are able to contextualise their skills within a meaningful process and understand the value of iterative design. 3D visual language enables students to investigate a multi-modal approach to learning and experiment with malleable materials through the application of real texture, as well as learn how to construct and join materials together.

These three main areas of study also encompass interleaved lessons to include: discussing and analysing the work of other artists (contextual studies) and sharing success and learning from each other.

Curriculum progression: 

In Year 7 the learning for 2D visual language is centred on 'objects' and in year 8 we progress to 'compositions and collections'. This ensures that students are able to use prior knowledge and skills to develop a deep appreciation of 2D visual language. In Year 7, 3D visual language is centred on clay modelling and in year 8 students revisit clay but also progress to work with paper and card manipulation and paper mache. In year 7, students work on a project designed to explore non-western art through mask making and Islamic pattern. In year 8 the project work retains its focus but we explore non-western art through Photography and 3D calligraphy. Students have a wealth of opportunity to use, revisit and implement a wide range of skill, medium and material across this key stage.


Meeting the needs of SEND and Pupil Premium students 

The Visual Arts as a suite of subjects offer a rich opportunity to engage pupils with special educational needs or disability through multisensory and multi-model enquiry. Art teachers use dialogue and meaningful interactions to reach every learner in their care. We have a department mantra of ‘every child is an artist’ and through this we nurture freedom of idea and expression for all. The use of ‘bookmarking our learning’ models successful annotation techniques and, through careful teacher modelling, all students are able to reflect meaningfully on their work in written form.

Homework

Homework for Years 7 and 8 is set as and when necessary, and typically includes research that can inform project work or prepare students for the next steps in their learning. In Art we will sometimes ask students to embed their skills and practise techniques they have learnt from class.

Assessment 

We have developed a feedforward style of assessment in Art, meaning that all advice is timely and focused on the next steps. This is mostly orchestrated through whole-class observations; particularly when we are practising a new technique or retrieving and developing existing skills. Students will complete a feedforward sheet and note the advice that they have received for reference and future use. Group critique and group discussion ensure a collaborative approach to success; it’s important that students know how success feels as well as how it looks.

GCSE Visual Arts

Fine Art

Fine Art is a popular GCSE course where students are nurtured to develop the necessary life skills associated with project-based learning through a student-centred learning environment. Art is what makes us human and, as a sophisticated form of communication, we make space to explore personal artistic and creative ideas in a way that celebrates diversity and individuality.

We delve deeply into project-based learning in year 9 and focus on the necessary skills associated with project work to appreciate how it feels to work in this way; as well as how a project could and look across the assessment objectives. The method of investigating this varies but is typically explored using print as medium to ensure ‘experimentation’ is fully explored.

In year 10 and 11 we typically generate two projects (component 1) and in the January of year 11 students begin responding to a theme set by the exam board. This is the exam unit (component 2) which concludes in a 10-hour period where students produce their final outcome. This takes place around Easter time. Each component is marked holistically by us and is externally moderated by AQA. This course is 100% Non-Examination Assessment, meaning that there is no written paper. 

Assessment and Progression

Examination Board:  

AQA

Grading system:

Projects are marked holistically across four assessment objectives.

1-9 (9 is highest)

Assessment:

A portfolio of work and a sustained investigation (component 1) (60%).

Externally-set exam unit (component 2) (40%).

Progression to Post-16:

A-Level Art and Design.

Future career links:

Illustration

Artist

Graphic Design

Print maker

Architect

Contact:

Mrs Rudman

erudman@didcotgirls.oxon.sch.uk

BTEC Art & Design

Course outline

The development of key skills that prove aptitude in art and design practice, such as generating and visually communicating creative responses to art and design briefs, are paramount on this course.

The BTEC in Art & Design Practice takes learners through a structured pathway towards creating functional and decorative craft and three-dimensional objects. There is a strong focus on ‘making for a purpose’ and learners generate their own ideas with a target audience in mind. Understanding Art & Design through the eyes of the consumer or client is one of the fundamental skills that learners will develop on this course.

Learners explore crafting through functional and decorative ceramics, decoupage, jewellery making and textiles techniques such as weaving, sewing and print making for home wares. In addition to a broad range of practical skills, students will learn how to plan and communicate ideas effectively to support future career progression, both within the field of craft but also more broadly within Art & Design.

Assessment and Progression

Examination Board:  

Pearson

Grading system:

BTEC Level 1/2

Assessment:

Marks are awarded through 3 main components:

Generating Ideas in Art and Design

Develop Practical Skills in Art and Design

Responding to a Client Brief

Future career links:

The skills developed through art and design education are integral to many roles in the creative industries. The creative sector is a collection of exciting and vibrant industries, including fashion, games, advertising, graphics and publishing, craft and product design, interior design and architecture. Collectively, the creative industries contributed £4.1 billion to the UK economy in 2015, outpacing the overall growth of the economy by 2.5 per cent.

Contact:

Miss Thursfield

ethursfield@didcotgirls.oxon.sch.uk

Graphic Communication

Course outline

Students on the Graphic Communication GCSE course are introduced to a variety of experiences exploring a range of graphic media, techniques and processes, including both traditional and new technologies. The project-based learning allows students to explore personal and individual responses to design starting points from the beginning of the course in Yr 9.

The Key Stage 4 schemes of work are designed to allow our students to experience how it feels to work like a designer, using up to date commercial design Adobe software applications and is taught by a subject specialist. Students work to a ‘brief’, which receives regular verbal feedback to enable students to challenge themselves and make progress. The students have two conjoined creative spaces to work in with 25 Apple Macs. Each design space has a distinctly different studio ‘feel,’ allowing flexibility to work in a wide variety of processes, media and scale, enabling students to extend ideas and projects beyond the computer screen.

Students have access to the most up to date industry standard Adobe applications and they have the opportunity to cover areas of study within Photoshop, Digital Photography, Typography, Illustration, Layout/Design for Print, Animation, Video Editing Print Making, Advertising and Packaging Design.

In Yr 10 and Yr 11, there are typically 2 projects submitted for GCSE – Component 1 (course work) and Component 2 (externally set exam commencing in January) students then sit a 10-hour exam in which they produce their final outcome.  This takes place around Easter time of year 11. The examining body for the course is AQA, which is also used for GCSE Art, therefor assessed on the same criteria. “(Each component is marked holistically by us and is externally moderated by AQA.)”

This course is 100% Non-Examination Assessment, meaning that there is no written paper. 

Assessment and Progression

Examination Board:  

AQA

Grading system:

Projects are marked holistically across four assessment objectives.

Grades awarded 1-9 (9 is highest)

Assessment:

A portfolio of work and a sustained investigation (component 1) (60%).

Externally-set exam unit (component 2) (40%).

Progression to Post-16:

A-Level Art and Design. Graphic Communication or Fine Art

Future career links:

Illustration

Graphic Design

Photography

Website Design

Video Editing

Package Design/ Cardboard Engineering

Printer/Print Maker

Architect

Artist

Contact:

Mr Ray

mray@didcotgirls.oxon.sch.uk

Back to Top